User-Centered Design and Evaluation of an Interactive Tool for Finding Research Collaborators AND Home Health Care Nurses’ Perceptions of the Post-hospitalization Information Needs of Geriatric Patients

Seminar Date: 
2012-02-10
Seminar Time: 
11am - 12pm
Seminar Location: 
M-184 VALE, 200 Meyran Avenue
Presenter: 
Chuck Borromeo & Katrina Romagnoli
Presenter's Institution: 
Department of Biomedical Informatics

User-Centered Design and Evaluation of an Interactive Tool for Finding Research Collaborators

Charles Borromeo, BS, Masters Fellow

Abstract:  Collaborative multi-disciplinary science (aka team science) has become a focus in the past several years.  Many research institutions created their own Research Networking (RN) applications (e.g. Digital Vita, Harvard Profiles, etc.) or deployed commercial products (e.g. SciVal) to facilitate collaboration at their institutions.  Eventually the CTSA funded a RN application (VIVO) to establish a national research network.  All of these tools mine data from researcher publications and funding information.  The RN tools use this data as part of their search algorithms to find potential collaborators.  My research project analyzes the software requirements for a collaborator search tool.  My project uses interviews, wireframe prototypes, and qualitative analysis to examine the data researchers need to find collaborators.  The goal is to design and evaluate a new prototype application.  The features of this prototype could serve, in turn, as a basis for improvements to existing RN applications.            

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Home Health Care Nurses’ Perceptions of the Post-hospitalization Information Needs of Geriatric Patients.

Katrina Romagnoli, MLIS, Doctoral Fellow

Abstract:  Objective: To conduct  a survey of the perceptions of home health care nurses regarding the post-hospitalization information needs of elderly patients.

Materials and Methods: A ranked list of information needs experienced by patients was developed by two focus groups of home care nurses.  The list was used, along with results of prior research, to form the basis for a broader survey of home care nurses’ perceptions of patients’ post-hospitalization information needs to ensure their reintegration into their prior living environment and potentially prevent unplanned hospital readmissions.

Results: Seventeen nurses participated in the two focus groups, producing a list of 28 information needs  grouped into six themes: medications, disease/condition, discharge, non-medication care, communication, and functional limitations. The survey was sent to 220 home-care nurses, with a 54.1% (119/220) response rate.

Discussion: Respondents identified several frequent, high-impact information needs that have not been previously discussed in the readmission literature.  These patient needs include  additional information about medication regimens,  a better understanding, of how sick they are, minimization of confusion and misunderstanding at discharge, education concerning non-medication care regimens such as wound care, durable medical equipment and home safety,  and an understanding of how much care they need and who can provide it.

Conclusions: Information needs identified by home health care nurses expanded upon and reinforced results from prior studies. Taken together, these results might be used todevelop interventions that may improve information sharing among clinicians, patients and caregivers during care transitions  to ensure their reintegration into their prior living environment and potentially prevent unplanned hospital readmissions.

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