OpenELIS – APHL, Open Source, Lab Information Systems, and Global Health

Seminar Date: 
2013-02-26
Seminar Time: 
10am - 11am
Seminar Location: 
5607 Baum Boulevard, Room 407A
Presenter: 
Bill Lober, MD MS
Presenter's Institution: 
University of Washington Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health

Special Global Health Seminar:

Abstract:  Dr. Lober has lead development of an open source lab information system (http://openelisglobal.org), based on a set of requirements, logical data model, and open source project sponsored over the last decade by the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL).  OpenELIS is currently used to support HIV care in Haiti, Cote d’Ivoire, and Vietnam.  This informal presentation/discussion will present OpenELIS as an example of the variety of challenges in developing an open source project, including functional, technical, architectural, and community considerations.  Mostly, you’ll learn what we’ve done wrong, and have a chance to second-guess the whole project!

Bio: Bill Lober, MD MS, is an Associate Professor in the University of Washington Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health, in health informatics and global health. Dr. Lober is Director of Informatics for the International Training and Education Center on HIV (I-TECH).  His work in Global Health Informatics is primarily in support of HIV care and treatment, through both clinical and national information system work, in Haiti, Kenya, Cote d'Ivoire, Mozambique, Namibia, and Vietnam.  At the health facility level, his group at the University of Washington develops and implements electronic medical records, lab systems, and data interoperability.  At the national level, they provide technical advice on disease surveillance, monitoring and evaluation systems, and the use of standards for eHealth architectures. Dr. Lober’s education and industry experience is in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and his clinical training is in Emergency Medicine.

This talk is sponsored by the Center for Health Informatics for the Underserved.

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